Why it’s not about parking

It’s not about parking. It’s never about parking.

Like many humans, I was disheartened to hear the vigilante fate of Deah, Yusor, and Razan, three young adults in Chapel Hill, NC who were accused of a parking discrepancy with a neighbor and sentenced to execution.

Like some Christians, I was alarmed to learn that the judge and jury of this parking crime was Craig, a lone white man who was a proud atheist with a concealed carry permit; further, that the alleged guilty parties were Muslim.

Like a few Americans, I was angered to know that the primary media outlets around the United States neglected to use terms like “terrorism” or “hate crime” when referring to this vigilante execution which, although too soon to tell, appears to be based upon religious intolerance.

Like most pluralists, I regret that we live in a post-9/11 society which holds Muslim and Terrorist to be synonymous.

And yet it seems that American society, which is largely Christian, has lost sight of its humanity.

What happened in Chapel Hill is not about parking.

It’s about one human’s inability to recognize their role as a human. It’s about not realizing that every other human being has a role, too. It’s about American society’s inability to accept that another person’s life has the same worth – if not more, by the virtue of it being someone else’s – than our own lives.

I’m not one to suggest Christianity create enemies. We certainly have enough. And I don’t propose that Christianity take a stance against atheism. We certainly judge enough.

But maybe this time – and maybe just this once – Christianity can stand with Deah, and with Yusor, and with Razan. Maybe we can stand in solidarity with our Muslim neighbors and coworkers, friends and strangers. Maybe we can, together, make a statement that, whether religious or otherwise, this kind of violence is not okay.

Don’t be a sheep. Don’t let the (alleged) “fair and balanced” media persuade you.

It’s not about parking. It’s never about parking.

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